MyPrivateBanking Blog
Daily Comments on the World of Wealth Management

Archive for September, 2014

Wealth Managers: Don’t be complacent about Robo-Advisors

Wednesday, September 17th, 2014

MyPrivateBanking Research has just published our first report on the new class of ‘robo-advisors’ that have joined the wealth management industry recently. Starting in the United States and now appearing in Europe, Canada and Australia, robo-advisors have become instantly controversial with differing prophesies of the part they’ll play in wealth management in the next few years.

In our report we seek to puncture some of the (second-hand) misconceptions about robo-advising. For example, robo-advisor firms are all about technology, certainly, but the first wave of robo-advisors are not yet as robo as can be; there’s more to come in terms of deployment of artificial intelligence and mobile technology, to name just two areas for future progress. Nor are robo-advisors homogenous pure passive index-trackers; among them there’s considerable variety when it comes to investment strategies – though it is true to say that many of them use passive ETFs as their main investment vehicles.

At the same time MyPrivateBanking believes that wealth managers are in danger of becoming dangerously complacent about the robo-advisor phenomenon. Industry practitioners and commentators may think that robo-advisors compare unfavorably with what’s on offer from conventional wealth management businesses but to do so is to place too much faith in the status quo. In particular, relying on face-to-face client meetings as an economic moat to defend one’s client base seems a flawed strategy.

In the face of the massive short-fall in the availability of investment advice for the mass-affluent market, the robo-advisor model has what it takes to set this market segment on sustainable wealth acquisition pathways. The robo-advisors are staking their future success on the belief that today’s savers and investors are able to maintain a consistent approach without the hand-holding that has up until now been seen as necessary by the wealth management industry. The danger for conventional wealth managers is that the lean, efficient robo model will catch on among their HNWI clients. No one should be in any doubt that robo-advisors are very focused on client enrolment and their approach is scale-able both in terms of pure numbers and the size of individual client portfolios they can work with.

 

How wearable technology invades everyday life

Thursday, September 11th, 2014

(by Roxana Palade, analyst)

A good indicator of how digitalization impacts our life is the use of technology in designing tech-enabled clothes (one important part of what we call the “wearable technology revolution”).

Every traveler has probably at some point made the dreadful experience of forgetting her smartphone charger. The fashion designer Pauline van Dongen has found a practical solution: the solar dress. Part of a truly innovative collection, the Dutch designer has created ‘intelligent clothes’ like the dress with integrated solar cells that can fully recharge a smartphone.

No solar dress-fan? Then you might want to purchase the GPS-enabled blazer that functions with the help of an app and directs you by means of vibrations and LED lights integrated into the jacket.

As these examples show, the smart phone and tablet may become a lot less important as the device of choice for consumers in their everyday lives. Financial institutions should start thinking hard about the implications of the next wave of mobile technology development. When, where and on what occasions will their clients need mobile services and support and how should these be delivered? Are there ways, for instance, to provide account information and transaction capabilities to the client without the requirement to use a smartphone or tablet? How, when and where should content get delivered to client? Wouldn’t the communication with the advisor work much better via video chat on a smart watch rather than a clunky phone screen?

Some may think that there is no urgency to answer these questions today. They may be very wrong.


 
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